Adult Ed

Adult Education English 2

1.0 Credit
36 weeks
Open

In English 2, students learn how the human experience—real life—is the foundation of the best stories, plays, poems, films, and articles. In each unit of the course, students explore a specific aspect of the human experience such as laughter, obstacles, betrayal, fear, and transformation. Through the study of literature, nonfiction, and life, students explore what it means to be human, what it means to be fulfilled, triumphant, empowered, and transformed.

As in life, students have many choices in the English 2 course. They choose the order in which they complete the units. Students also choose some of the works they read and have countless choices when it comes to demonstrating what they have learned. Whether reading a poem or a novel, writing a story or an analysis, or studying a Shakespearean tragedy or a modern suspense film, students explore what it means to be human, a subject on which they are already experts!

Competencies

Crafting a Narrative

Students will demonstrate an understanding of crafting a narrative by analyzing an author’s diction and tone, explaining narrative point of view, describing plot structures, and creating a story using narrative elements.

Research and Structure in Writing

Students will demonstrate an understanding of research and structure in writing by evaluating resources, documenting research, explaining supporting evidence, and creating a structured essay following an outline.

Argumentative Writing

Students will demonstrate an understanding of argumentative writing by explaining the foundations of a strong argument, describing persuasive appeals in argumentative writing, and creating a structured essay following an outline.

Critiques

Students will demonstrate an understanding of critiques by analyzing the development of theme in texts, explaining suspense techniques used in films, and creating a film critique.

Major Topics and Concepts

Segment I
Module 1

  • 01.00 Introduction
  • 01.01 Grammar
  • 01.02 Poetry
  • 01.03 Connotation, Denotation, and Imagery
  • 01.04 Humor
  • 01.05 Tone
  • 01.06 Plot, Pacing, and Point of View
  • 01.07 Alternate Plot Structures
  • 01.08 Narrative Writing
  • 01.09 Pre-writing Process
  • 01.10 Writing Tips
  • 01.11 More Writing Tips
  • 01.12 First Draft
  • 01.13 Discussion-Based Assesment
  • 01.14 Final Draft
  • 01.17 Module One Exam

Module 2

  • 02.00 Introduction
  • 02.01 The Hurdle
  • 02.02 Historical Context and Human Rights
  • 02.03 Point of View
  • 02.04 Prompt and Human Rights
  • 02.05 The Victory
  • 02.06 Analysis
  • 02.07 Research
  • 02.08 Citations
  • 02.09 The Introduction
  • 02.10 Discussion-Based Assessment
  • 02.11 The Outline
  • 02.12 The First Draft
  • 02.13 Grammar
  • 02.14 The Final Draft
  • 02.16 Module Two Exam
  • 02.17 Segment One Exam

Segment II
Module 3

  • 03.00 Introduction
  • 03.01 Fears, Anxieties, Phobias, Oh My!
  • 03.02 The Reality of Fear
  • 03.03 Nothing to Fear
  • 03.04 Free from Fear
  • 03.05 Fascination with Fear
  • 03.06 No Hyding From Fear
  • 03.07 Surprise!
  • 03.08 Fear In Film
  • 03.09 Project Runaway!
  • 03.10 Discussion-Based Assessment
  • 03.13 Module Three Exam

Module 4

  • 04.00 Introduction
  • 04.01 Apostrophes and Homonyms
  • 04.02 Julius Caesar, Act I
  • 04.03 Julius Caesar, Act II
  • 04.04 Julius Caesar, Act III
  • 04.05 Julius Caesar, Acts IV and V
  • 04.06 Argumentative Writing
  • 04.07 Claims and Counterclaims
  • 04.08 Develop Your Position
  • 04.09 Discussion-Based Assessment
  • 04.10 Outline Your Argument
  • 04.11 Write your Argument
  • 04.12 Your Final Draft
  • 04.14 Module Four Exam
  • 04.15 Segment Two Exam