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Status

Open

Estimated Completion Time

2 Segments/36 weeks

Overview

Why do people do what they do? English IV you will give you a front row seat to study of the motives that have driven people’s actions for centuries. Along the way you will encounter epic heroes defying danger, tormented minds succumbing to the power of greed and ambition, enlightened thinkers striving for individual rights and freedoms, sensitive souls attempting to capture human emotion, and determined debaters taking a stand on critical issues. You will read to analyze the way language is used to express human motivation and research to examine the results of actions in the real world. The lessons in each module will give you the tools you need to gain insights from what you read and to use your knowledge in creative and analytical writing.

 

Note: content varies depending on course version. For currently enrolled students, please refer to the syllabus located in the course information area for curriculum specifics.

Course Requirements

To achieve success, students are expected to submit work in each course weekly. Students can learn at their own pace; however, “any pace” still means that students must make progress in the course every week. To measure learning, students complete self-checks, practice lessons, multiple choice questions, projects, discussion-based assessments, and discussions. Students are expected to maintain regular contact with teachers; the minimum requirement is monthly. When teachers, students, and parents work together, students are successful.

Major Topics and Concepts

 

Segment 1

Forces of Nature

  • Readings
    • Excerpts of Beowulf, Macbeth, and “Heroism.”
  • Concepts
    • Character development
    • Plot analysis
    • Theme
    • Tone
    • Mood
    • Literary devices
    • Syntax
    • Thematic analysis
    • Six traits of writing
    • Narrative writing process
    • Proper use of conventions
  • Skills
    • Reading Shakespeare
    • Conducting literary analysis
    • Writing to address multiple texts
    • Incorporating direct quotes
    • Planning a narrative
    • Writing a narrative

 

Carousel of Progress

  • Readings
    • Preamble to the United States Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and excerpts from various articles and court cases.
  • Concepts
    • Interpretations of the Bill of Rights
    • Theme
    • Domain specific language
    • Precise language
    • Transitions
    • Conventions
    • Six traits of writing
    • Informative/explanatory writing
  • Skills
    • Analyzing informational texts
    • Researching to support an informative/explanatory topic
    • Creating an annotated bibliography
    • Using MLA citations
    • Writing an informative/explanatory article

 

An Empire Divided (Honors)

  • Readings
    • Land of Hope and Glory,” “Song to the Men of England,” and The Man Who Would Be King
  • Concepts
    • Figurative language
    • Poetic forms and devices
    • Elements of Fiction: plot, character, conflict, theme, setting, point of view
    • Tone
    • Mood
    • Diction
    • Connotation and denotation
    • Syntax
  • Skills
    • Experiencing and analyzing poetry
    • Analyzing literary text
    • Writing an informative/explanatory essay

 

Segment 2

Expressions

  • Readings
    • Selected poems, “The Story of an Hour,” “A Jury of Her Peers,” excerpts of pieces written by Benjamin Franklin, Judith Sargent Murray, and selected newspaper and magazine articles.
  • Concepts
    • Figurative language
    • Figures of speech
    • Poetic forms and devices
    • Tone
    • Mood
    • Diction
    • Connotation and denotation
    • Imagery
    • Allusion
    • Symbolism
    • Character development
    • Historical context
    • Thematic analysis
    • Summary
  • Skills
    • Experiencing and analyzing poetry
    • Writing poetry
    • Reading and analyzing informational text
    • Identifying and understanding different perspectives
    • Summarizing

 

Proof or Satire

  • Reading
    • Selected political speeches, selected closing arguments from well-known court cases, selected newspaper and magazine articles, “Advice to Youth,” and “Burlesque Autobiography”
  • Concepts
    • Basic elements of persuasion
    • Compare and contrast
    • Argument analysis
    • Characteristics of an effective claim
    • Appeals to logic, emotion, and ethics
    • Logical fallacies
    • Research skills
    • Ethical researching and writing practices
    • Six traits of writing
    • Argument writing process
    • MLA format
    • Domain specific language
    • Precise language
    • Humor and satire
    • Proper use of conventions
  • Skills
    • Analyzing arguments
    • Identifying appeals to logos, pathos, and ethos
    • Researching multiple sides of an issue
    • Stating a claim
    • Interpreting visual representations of data
    • Creating an infographic
    • Identifying satire
    • Analyzing satirical works

 

Fall of the Empire (Honors)

  • Readings
    • “Shooting an Elephant,” “Speech at Calicut,” “To Every Englishman in India,” and various news articles
  • Concepts
    • Characteristics of nonfiction texts
    • Theme
    • Figurative language
    • Tone
    • Mood
    • Diction
    • Connotation and denotation
    • Syntax
    • Conventions
  • Skills
    • Analyzing traits of a personal essay
    • Research to support writing a news article
    • Analyzing traits of professional writers
    • Writing an inverted pyramid news article

 

 

 

Career

Artistic Director

Status

Open

Estimated Completion Time

3-4 Weeks

Competency

Students will demonstrate an understanding of literary elements and devices by examining and explaining characterization, making logical predictions about and connections to plot, and analyzing the author’s craft in a variety of literary texts by identifying and explaining literary archetypes, elements, and devices.

Project

You are the Artistic Director of a theatre company. One of your responsibilities is to plan performances for the upcoming season and complete the performance lineup submission forms for the theatre’s board of directors to approve. You will choose a unifying theme upon which to represent these performances once you select and familiarize yourself with material from at least one play, poem, and novel.

Career

Tour Manager

Status

Open

Estimated Completion Time

3-4 Weeks

Competency

Students will demonstrate an understanding of explanatory writing by writing informative texts which examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information, and by selecting, organizing, and analyzing content from a variety of sources.

Project

You are a Tour Manager for a company of your choice. You are responsible for creating written materials for a seven-day tour. This will include an itinerary and a tour pamphlet for a specific audience to a particular location. You will choose the location.

Career

Video Game Writer

Status

Open

Estimated Completion Time

3-4 Weeks

Competency

Students will demonstrate an understanding of narrative writing by writing a narrative that effectively applies narrative strategies for a variety of purposes and audiences.

Project

You are a Video Game Writer. You report to the Lead Designer who asked you to write the story for a new video game. The world of game design is broad and complex, but your job is to focus on the narrative told through the game. You get to decide who and what this game is about! You will need to use narrative strategies to create a story treatment that appeals to your intended audience.

Career

Agricultural Scientist

Status

Open

Estimated Completion Time

3-4 Weeks

Competency

Students will demonstrate an understanding of the investigation of topics through research and inquiry by creating an annotated bibliography that includes analysis and integration of information for a specific purpose.

Project

You are an Agricultural Scientist. You are asked to put together a list of resources that will help farmers, landowners, landscapers, and homeowners of a specific area. This list of resources will be used to improve the production of their crops and landscapes. It will also help them solve a variety of agricultural problems they might encounter. You will select your focus area, research your topic, analyze the information, and then create an annotated bibliography. Your annotated bibliography will explain why you selected your resources and how they will be helpful for farmers, landowners, landscapers, and/or homeowners. This will serve as a master list that the Department of Agriculture will use when it puts together informational websites and other resources for the public.

Career

Forensic Meteorologist

Status

Open

Estimated Completion Time

3-4 Weeks

Competency

Students will demonstrate an understanding of source evaluation and information integration by creating an essay, report, or presentation which addresses a question or solves a problem relevant to science, social studies, or technology, and is supported by strong and thorough evidence.

Project

You are a Forensic Meteorologist. You work for a large insurance company investigating a claim for an insured party. Your job is to reconstruct and analyze the weather conditions at the time of the event for the claim under investigation to help determine if the claim is valid. An example of an event under investigation could be a car accident: Did the sun, torrential rain, or any other weather condition during the catastrophic event cause the accident, or was it an operator error? You will write a report, with your conclusions, based on the data and supporting evidence you collected and analyzed.

Career

Web Administrator

Status

Open

Estimated Completion Time

3-4 Weeks

Competency

Students will demonstrate an understanding of listening to and viewing oral presentations critically by evaluating a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, use of evidence and rhetoric, stance, premises, links among ideas, word choice, points of emphasis, and tone within an analysis or review.

Project

You are a Web Administrator for an organization that brings awareness of its cause to the world through a YouTube nonprofit channel (the topic can be of your choice). You will identify videos that will help educate others on both sides of a topic.

You will view and listen to these videos critically, making note of point of view, reasoning, rhetoric, points of emphasis, tone, and visuals in order to ensure that you have presented a balanced view of the issue. You will then write a recommendation for the director of the organization for which you work, which will include a summary of these videos and a critical analysis.

Career

Lobbyist

Status

Open

Estimated Completion Time

3-4 Weeks

Competency

Students will demonstrate an understanding of writing arguments by analyzing and critiquing topics, making connections and forming judgements, outlining and presenting the argument, and providing relevant details with sufficient evidence.

Project

You are a Lobbyist for an organization that wishes to influence people to support its cause. You are tasked with creating a campaign. This role has many tasks, but you will start with a blog post that kicks off the campaign.

Career

Advertising Account Manager

Status

Open

Estimated Completion Time

3-4 Weeks

Competency

Students will demonstrate the ability to speak effectively by presenting information, findings, and supporting evidence; conveying a clear and distinct perspective, such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning; alternative or opposing perspectives are addressed; and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and a range of formal and informal tasks.

Project

You are a Advertising Account Manager (Links to an external site.) for a large metropolitan advertising firm. One of your largest clients wants to rebrand and “reboot” their highly successful but aging ad campaign. You will need to make an audio-video presentation with supporting evidence why they should represent their product from a different perspective or make changes to their original target demographic group.

Status

Open

Experiences allow students to demonstrate mastery of competencies through various real-world or hands-on learning opportunities, such as travel, service learning, independent study, internships or entrepreneurship. During an experience, students elect to meet all or some of the competencies in a particular competency group (ie. English 1, Economics, Biology, …), as an alternative to taking the course. Each experience is customized to the student’s opportunity. The student works with a VLACS instructor to determine deliverables that demonstrate mastery of the competencies and secures an outside expert to enrich the experience.

In Experiences students will:

  1. Meet weekly with their instructor.
  2. Secure an outside expert.
  3. Plan the experience prior to completing it. Credit is not awarded for experiences completed prior to enrollment and completion of the planning process.
  4. For many experiences, spend time at a business or other location.

Types of Experiences:

Independent Study

By signing up for an independent study, you will be able to direct your own learning, identifying what you want to learn and how you will demonstrate that you have mastered your learning objectives.

Internship

Internships allow you to gain professional experience, make connections, and become familiar with a career while working on site with mentors and professionals in a career of your interest.

Travel

While travel can be a great experience for learning life lessons, it is also an excellent way to acquire the knowledge and skills that allow you to demonstrate mastery in a variety of competencies. The world is a classroom and travel experiences will connect your real-world experiences to the learning that you seek.

Service Learning

In-Service Learning, you collaborate with members of your community to address issues to improve your community. You will connect your service with discipline-specific content so that learning can take place through problem solving and collaboration.

Entrepreneurship

Starting your own business is a great way to learn. This type of experience allows you to engage in an entrepreneurial experience and receive credit for competencies you master through this experience.

Credits 1

Meets English graduation requirement. Only English 4 Experience earns a badge.

Competencies

  • Listening
    Students will demonstrate an understanding of listening to and viewing oral presentations critically by evaluating a speaker's point of view, reasoning, use of evidence and rhetoric, stance, premises, links among ideas, word choice, points of emphasis, and tone within an analysis or review.
  • Narrative Writing
    Students will demonstrate an understanding of narrative writing by writing a narrative that effectively applies narrative strategies for a variety of purposes and audiences.
  • Literary Elements and Devices
    Students will demonstrate an understanding of literary elements and devices by examining and explaining characterization, making logical predictions about and connections to plot, and analyzing the author’s craft in a variety of literary texts by identifying and explaining literary archetypes, elements, and devices.
  • Explanatory Writing
    Students will demonstrate an understanding of explanatory writing by writing informative texts which examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information, and by selecting, organizing, and analyzing content from a variety of sources.
  • Reading Informational Sources
    Students will demonstrate an understanding of source evaluation and information integration by creating an essay, report, or presentation which addresses a question or solves a problem relevant to science, social studies, or technology, and is supported by strong and thorough evidence.
  • Research Using Technology
    Students will demonstrate an understanding of the investigation of topics through research and inquiry by creating an annotated bibliography that includes analysis and integration of information for a specific purpose.
  • Speaking
    Students will demonstrate an understanding of speaking effectively by presenting information, conveying a clear and distinct perspective, and adopting organization, development, substance, and style appropriate to the purpose and audience of the situation.
  • Writing Arguments
    Students will demonstrate an understanding of writing arguments by analyzing and critiquing topics, making connections and forming judgements, outlining and presenting the argument, and providing relevant details with sufficient evidence.

Pre-Requisites

None

Honors

Course: To complete the honors version of this offering, you must discuss this with your instructor during your welcome call.

Project/Experience: Honors is awarded by earning "Exceeds" on all rubric assessments.

Attend a virtual open house

We offer regular online open house webinars where VLACS staff members provide parents and students with an overview of our programs and answer questions about online learning.