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Status

Open

Estimated Completion Time

2 segments/36 weeks

Overview

Join us in English II to see how the human experience – real life, your life – is the foundation of the best stories, plays, poems, films, and articles. In each unit of the course, we explore a specific aspect of the human experience such as Laughter, Obstacles, Betrayal, and Fear. Through the study of literature, nonfiction, and life, we will explore what it means to be human, what it means to be fulfilled, triumphant, empowered, and transformed.

 

Note: content varies depending on course version. For currently enrolled students, please refer to the syllabus located in the course information area for curriculum specifics.

 

Course Requirements

To achieve success, students are expected to submit work in each course weekly. Students can learn at their own pace; however, “any pace” still means that students must make progress in the course every week. To measure learning, students complete self-checks, practice lessons, multiple choice questions, projects, discussion-based assessments, and discussions. Students are expected to maintain regular contact with teachers; the minimum requirement is monthly. When teachers, students, and parents work together, students are successful.

Major Topics and Concepts

Segment One:

Module 1

  • 01.00 Introduction
  • 01.01 Grammar
  • 01.02 Poetry
  • 01.03 Connotation, Denotation, and Imagery
  • 01.04 Humor
  • 01.05 Tone
  • 01.06 Plot, Pacing, and Point of View
  • 01.07 Alternate Plot Structures
  • 01.08 Narrative Writing
  • 01.09 Pre-writing Process
  • 01.10 Writing Tips
  • 01.11 More Writing Tips
  • 01.12 First Draft
  • 01.13 Discussion-Based Assesment
  • 01.14 Final Draft
  • 01.15 Honors: Love Poem
  • 01.16 Honors: Love of Things
  • 01.17 Module One Exam

 

Module 2

  • 02.00 Introduction
  • 02.01 The Hurdle
  • 02.02 Historical Context and Human Rights
  • 02.03 Point of View
  • 02.04 Prompt and Human Rights
  • 02.05 The Victory
  • 02.06 Analysis
  • 02.07 Research
  • 02.08 Citations
  • 02.09 The Introduction
  • 02.10 Discussion-Based Assessment
  • 02.11 The Outline
  • 02.12 The First Draft
  • 02.13 Grammar
  • 02.14 The Final Draft
  • 02.15 Honors: The Solution
  • 02.16 Module Two Exam
  • 02.17 Segment One Exam
  • 02.18 Segment One Honors Exam
  • 00.01 Segment One Collaboration

 

Segment Two:

Module 3

  • 03.00 Introduction
  • 03.01 Fears, Anxieties, Phobias, Oh My!
  • 03.02 The Reality of Fear
  • 03.03 Nothing to Fear
  • 03.04 Free from Fear
  • 03.05 Fascination with Fear
  • 03.06 No Hyding From Fear
  • 03.07 Surprise!
  • 03.08 Fear In Film
  • 03.09 Project Runaway!
  • 03.10 Discussion-Based Assessment
  • 03.11 Honors:Constructing Meaning
  • 03.12 Honors: Bringing it all Together
  • 03.13 Module Three Exam

 

Module 4

  • 04.00 Introduction
  • 04.01 Apostrophes and Homonyms
  • 04.02 Julius Caesar, Act I
  • 04.03 Julius Caesar, Act II
  • 04.04 Julius Caesar, Act III
  • 04.05 Julius Caesar, Acts IV and V
  • 04.06 Argumentative Writing
  • 04.07 Claims and Counterclaims
  • 04.08 Develop Your Position
  • 04.09 Discussion-Based Assessment
  • 04.10 Outline Your Argument
  • 04.11 Write your Argument
  • 04.12 Your Final Draft
  • 04.13 Honors: The Lay of the Were-Wolf
  • 04.14 Module Four Exam
  • 04.15 Segment Two Exam
  • 04.16 Segment Two Honors Exam
  • 00.02 Segment Two Collaboration

 

Career

Freelance Writer

Status

Open

Estimated Completion Time

6-8 Weeks

Competency

Students will demonstrate an understanding of crafting a narrative by analyzing an author’s diction and tone, explaining narrative point of view, describing plot structures, and creating a story using narrative elements.

Project

You are a freelance writer hoping to get a book deal with a publishing company. The company is having a contest inviting authors to use a favorite novel or short story as inspiration. You are required to create a scene in first person from a character’s point of view other than the narrative perspective that is already being used. The winner will have their first novel or book of short stories published which could be the start of a successful freelance writing career! This project has two parts, A and B.

Career

Project Manager

Status

Open

Estimated Completion Time

6-8 Weeks

Competency

Students will demonstrate an understanding of research and structure in writing by evaluating resources, documenting research, explaining supporting evidence, and creating a structured essay following an outline.

Project

You are a Product Manager in Marketing for a company of your choice, representing a product of your choice. You will create an informative resource for your customers that provides research-backed evidence supporting your product’s superiority, thus encouraging sales. In Part B, you may choose how to present this sales resource, such as direct-marketing email, white paper, or company blog post.

As a product manager, your research and written communication skills are a key part of your day-to-day responsibilities. Providing the sales team and their clients with product information that is clearly written, professionally presented, and includes supporting evidence is necessary to help your clients determine that your product or service is best suited to meet their needs and requirements.

Career

Wildlife Conservationist Manager

Status

Open

Estimated Completion Time

6 - 8 Weeks

Competency

Students will demonstrate an understanding of argumentative writing by explaining the foundations of a strong argument, describing persuasive appeals in argumentative writing, and creating a structured essay following an outline.

Project

During this two-part project you will take on the role of a Wildlife Conservationist Manager for a non-profit organization. Your task is to present in front of Congress arguing for particular species to remain on the endangered species list. In order to present your argument effectively, you need to have a solid understanding of how an effective argument is designed.

This project is broken down into two tasks: Part A and Part B and in this part (A), your task is to create a brief guide on how to outline and write an effective argument which will provide your team and future managers of wildlife conservation an effective How-To when needed for future Congressional hearings. In Part B, you will outline and write your actual argument.

Career

Journalist

Status

Open

Estimated Completion Time

6-8 Weeks

Competency

Students will demonstrate an understanding of critiques by analyzing the development of themes in texts, explaining suspense techniques used in films, and creating a critique.

Project

You are a newly hired journalist working for the city newspaper. You love films and want to be the one who writes film reviews and critiques. Your editor likes your work, has given you a press pass for the local film festival and offered you a chance to critique the main showing. If your editor likes your review, then the job is yours.

This project has two parts, Part A and Part B. In Part A, you will refresh your understanding of all aspects of critique writing. In Part B, you will write your critique.

Status

Open

Experiences allow you to explore a career field you’re curious about while mastering competencies for school credit. Through experiential learning, you will learn skills and apply these skills to tasks you would complete as part of a career, rather than completing traditional assessments like essays or tests. During your experience, you’ll work with a professional in the field to support your learning. You’ll earn a badge for your accomplishments, which you can share on social media and higher education platforms, or with colleges, potential employers, peers, and/or colleagues to display your qualifications.

Here’s how experiences work:

  1. Each competency you work on is addressed through a separate deliverable predetermined by you and your instructor.
  2. Guided learning for each module consists of research and/or work with a professional in the field. Your instructor will coach you through this process.
  3. Each module culminates in a final demonstration of understanding, which includes a deliverable and a discussion-based assessment with your instructor.

Here’s an example:

Let’s say you’re curious about a career in healthcare. You decide you’d like to learn about this career area, make a professional connection, earn a badge and earn competencies for your 9th grade English requirement. While enrolled in English 1 Experiences, you conduct research to better understand language and structure in writing. Then, you work with an Occupational Therapist who helps you apply this understanding to the creation of an informational video. The video aims to advise the family members of patients regarding adaptive equipment and accommodations to help them support their family members as they go about their daily tasks. You’ve earned the Language and Structure in Writing competency! (This is just one example of the many ways experiences can bridge competencies to careers.)

*A parent/guardian permission form and background check of the outside expert are required for students to work with outside experts without parental supervision.

 

*Please have an idea for an outside expert in mind prior to enrollment or consult with our counseling department by emailing [email protected] prior to enrollment for support identifying one.

Credits 1

Meets English graduation requirement. Only English 2 Experience earns a badge.

Competencies

  • Crafting a Narrative
    Students will demonstrate an understanding of crafting a narrative by analyzing an author’s diction and tone, explaining narrative point of view, describing plot structures, and creating a story using narrative elements.
  • Research and Structure in Writing
    Students will demonstrate an understanding of research and structure in writing by evaluating resources, documenting research, explaining supporting evidence, and creating a structured essay following an outline.
  • Critiques
    Students will demonstrate an understanding of critiques by analyzing the development of theme in texts, explaining suspense techniques used in films, and creating a film critique.
  • Argumentative Writing
    Students will demonstrate an understanding of argumentative writing by explaining the foundations of a strong argument, describing persuasive appeals in argumentative writing, and creating a structured essay following an outline.

Pre-Requisites

None

Honors

Course: To complete the honors version of this offering, you must discuss this with your instructor during your welcome call.

Project/Experience: Honors is awarded by earning "Exceeds" on all rubric assessments.

Attend a virtual open house

We offer regular online open house webinars where VLACS staff members provide parents and students with an overview of our programs and answer questions about online learning.